Secret Restaurant Recipes

image002Secret Restaurant Recipes from the world’s Top Kosher Restaurants is the lasted in a whole series of books by Leah Schapira and Victoria Dwek. For me it was the best one to date and I have loved everyone that I have read. The others in the series are Passover Made Easy, Starters and Sides, Kids Cooking and Dairy Made Easy. Each one offers truly delicious Kosher recipes to please any palate.image003

This book is different in that the recipes are from Kosher restaurants all over the world. This duo’s other books have recipes that were written by home cooks and for home cooks. The recipes in this new release are written by over 70 professional chefs. The type of recipes that make me want to eat the page with photos to match. The recipes are simple enough for a home cook to execute easily and perhaps the less experienced will learn along the way.

Chicken Fingers with Dipping Sauce, Shallots’ Beer-Battered Onion Rings, Sesame Chicken, Eggplant Chicken with Garlic Sauce and Mongolian Beef. Those are just a tiny sampling of the fabulous meals you can make at home. These dishes are delicious whether you keep Kosher or not. It is not too late to pick up a copy for someone special for Chanukah. I have included a couple of my favorite recipes for you to enjoy and make you want more of the amazing new cookbook Secret Restaurant Recipes from the World’s Top Kosher Restaurants by Lean Schapira and Victoria Dwek.

Sea Bass Spring Roll

Sea Bass Spring Roll

Eggplant Chicken with Garlic Sauce

Eggplant Chicken with Garlic Sauce

Sea Bass Spring Rolls
Yields 14
Parve
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Ingredients
½ lb Chilean sea bass, cut into ¼-inch cubes
1 lb kani (imitation crab), shredded
3 Tbsp mayonnaise
1 Tbsp sesame oil
½ tsp mirin
½ tsp kosher salt
14 sheets feuille de brick or spring roll wrappers
oil, for frying
Instructions
In a medium bowl, combine sea bass, kani, mayonnaise, sesame oil, mirin, and salt.
Spread filling over the bottom-center of each wrapper. Fold in sides; roll up tightly.
Heat oil in a saucepan or deep fryer. Add spring rolls, a few at a time, and fry until golden brown, about 3-4 minutes.
Notes
Mirin is a Japanese rice wine, a staple in Japanese cuisine. It’s the ingredient that’s traditionally used to flavor sushi rice. It has a very low alcohol content and a strong, sweet flavor, so you only need a little bit.
At Mocha Bleu, these spring rolls are served alongside sweet ginger sauce for dipping. To make your own, whisk together: 6 tablespoons sweet chili sauce, 2 teaspoons soy sauce, 2 teaspoons rice wine vinegar, 2 teaspoons sugar, 1 teaspoon fresh minced ginger, and 1 minced garlic clove.
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Eggplant Chicken 
in Garlic Sauce
Serves 2
Meat
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Ingredients
1 lb eggplant, cut into 1½-inch chunks
· kosher salt, for sprinkling
1 lb skinless boneless chicken breasts, cut into bite-sized pieces
3 Tbsp cornstarch, for dredging
3 Tbsp chopped garlic
¼ tsp chili pepper flakes
⅓ cup shredded carrots
· canola or vegetable oil,
for frying
Dark Sauce
⅓ cup low-sodium soy sauce
2 Tbsp sugar
1 tsp toasted sesame oil
1 tsp ground black pepper
1 tsp cornstarch
Instructions
1. Sprinkle eggplant chunks with salt; allow to rest for 20-30 minutes (this process will prevent eggplant from soaking up too much oil during frying). Rinse salt from eggplant and drain well.
2. Meanwhile, prepare the sauce: In a small bowl, whisk together soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil, black pepper, and cornstarch. Set aside.
3. Prepare the chicken: Place cornstarch into a shallow dish; toss the chicken in cornstarch to coat very well.
4. Heat 3-inches oil in a wok or 1-inch oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add chicken to hot oil and pan-fry until golden, 2-3 minutes per side. Remove from oil and set aside.
5. Add the eggplant to the same pan and fry until light golden, 2-3 minutes. Remove from oil and set aside. Discard oil, leaving about 1 tablespoon in the wok or pan.
6. Add garlic and chili pepper flakes and stir-fry for about 30 seconds. Return chicken and eggplant to the pan. Add carrots and sauce and stir-fry for 2 minutes, coating all the ingredients well with the sauce.
Notes
"Of all the rules of the kitchen that I have learned and followed over the years, I feel the most important one is if you enjoy cooking, then you do it right. Try not to cook if in a foul mood. And just have fun."
-Daniel Gilkarov, Segal’s Oasis Grill
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Rum Raisin Rice Pudding Cake

 

Silk Cashewmilk and it's Companions for Rum Raisin Rice Pudding Cake with Salted Caramel (Photo Credit: Sandy Axelrod)

Silk Cashewmilk and it’s Companions for Rum Raisin Rice Pudding Cake with Salted Caramel
(Photo Credit: Sandy Axelrod)

Rum Raisin Rice Pudding Cake with Salted Caramel made with Silk Cashewmilk (Photo Credit: Sandy Axelrod)

Rum Raisin Rice Pudding Cake with Salted Caramel made with Silk Cashewmilk
(Photo Credit: Sandy Axelrod)

Have you ever heard of Silk Cashewmilk? I am thrilled to have been chosen by the good people at Silk to help introduce a brand new product Silk Cashewmilk. So my challenge was to use Silk Cashewmilk as I would regular milk in my recipes. The first thing that I made was a delicious Peanut Butter and Banana Smoothie which tasted so decadent and creamy. I honestly tasted no difference in my smoothie than when I make it using regular dairy milk. What I did notice was that my tummy felt much better because of the lack of lactose which tends to not agree with me. Of course I used the Silk Cashewmilk in my cereal and loved it. It is rich tasting and very creamy in texture. But I have to say the pièce de resistance was my Rum Raisin Rice Pudding Cake. I have to admit that the recipe was not 100% my own. It was inspired by a recipe for Rice Pudding Cake that is in Dorie Greenspan’s latest book “Baking Chez Moi: Recipes from My Paris Home to Your Home Anywhere”. The cake was outrageous! The milk behaved quite well and created a very luscious rice pudding the remained creamy even after baked with the custard. The only difference I see between Silk Cashewmilk and their other milks is the color. It is not as white as the others but the flavor is great. In fact it is so delicious you will be thrilled to be able to drink milk again and not suffer the consequences. What tastes better than a nice slice of chocolate cake with a cold glass of milk? Silk Cashewmilk that is. 

Silk Cashewmilk is made with the special creaminess of cashews that gives it an irresistibly creamy taste. It is perfect over cereal, in recipes or poured into a glass. Some added benefits are that new Silk Cashewmilk has 50% more calcium than dairy milk and 25% less calories that skim milk at only 60 calories per serving. This makes Silk Cashewmilk an excellent source of calcium and vitamin D.

The Silk people know that if you try their new product you are sure to love it. Sign up for their Silk eNewletter at silk.com/signup where you will get the latest news and an instant coupon. And while you are online why don’t you like their Facebook page www.facebook.com/SilkUS. Also take a look at their Pinterest page where you will find lots of recipe ideas using Silk Cashewmilk.

Rum Raisin Rice Pudding Cake with Salted Caramel made with Silk Cashewmilk (Photo Credit: Sandy Axelrod)

Rum Raisin Rice Pudding Cake with Salted Caramel made with Silk Cashewmilk
(Photo Credit: Sandy Axelrod)

Rum Raisin Rice Pudding Cake with Salted Caramel Sauce
Serves 8
Caramel topped creamy rice pudding with cinnamon, raisins and rum baked into a cake and served with Salted Caramel.
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For the rice
Salt
1/2 cup short-grain rice, such as Arborio
4 cups Silk Cashewmilk
1/3 cup sugar
1/3 cup raisins
1 teaspoon cinnamon
zest of 1 lemon
2 large eggs
1 tablespoon light rum
For the caramel
1 cup sugar
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1/4 cup water
Pinch of Fleur de Sel
Instructions
For the rice: Bring 3 cups of lightly salted water to a boil in a 4-quart saucepan. Add the rice and boil for 10 minutes, then drain. Rinse out the pan, pour in the Silk Cashewmilk and sugar and bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Make sure not to leave the store! The second you turn away is when it will boil over so stay alert. Stir as the milk boils up and keep stirring until it goes down, then lower the heat to a simmer and stir in the rice, cinnamon and raisins. Keep vigilant until some of the milk has reduced because it could still boil over and make a horrid mess.Cook stirring regularly for 40 to 50 minutes, until most of the milk has been absorbed and the pudding is creamy. Scrape the pudding into a medium bowl.
For the caramel: When the rice has cooked for about 30 minutes center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 400F. When it reached 400F place an 8-inch round cake pan in the oven. It is much easier to line a pan with caramel when the pan is warm. Line a 9x13-inch pan I use Pyrex) with paper towels and set aside. Have a kettle of boiling water ready and a heatproof measuring cup or small pitcher.
Stir the sugar, lemon juice and water together in a medium skillet, preferably nonstick, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. As soon as the sugar starts to turn color around the edges start stirring with a wooden spoon in small circular motions working your way from the edges to the center of the pan. Keep stirring like this until the sugar turns a pale amber color. Remove from the heat; the caramel will continue to darken and be just the right color, a medium amber, in the time it takes to line the pan and measure out the sauce.
Carefully remove the cake pan from the oven. Pour half of the caramel into the cake pan and the other half into a measuring cup or pitcher. Working carefully and quickly swirl the caramel all over the bottom and up the sides a little. Just remember that the pan is hot and the caramel is hotter!
The remaining caramel is going to be your sauce and you may need to thin it a bit with some hot water until it is the color and consistency that you like.
Back to the rice: Add the lemon zest to the warm rice and stir it in. Lightly stir the eggs and rum together in a small bowl. Add a heaping tablespoon of the rice to the eggs and then add the mixture to the bowl of rice stirring with a wooden spoon or heatproof spatula until nicely blended. Turn the rice into the caramel lined cake pan and smooth the top. Place the cake pan into the Pyrex dish lined with paper towels. Slide the set up into the oven and pour the hot water into the Pyrex dish to come halfway up the side of the cake pan. Tent with foil.
Bake for 1 hour, or until firm and a skewer stuck in it comes out clean. Carefully remove the cake from the water bath and dry the bottom and sides. Run a knife between the cake and the pan and then cover with a large platter that has a lip. Flip it over and wait for the caramel to settle before removing the cake pan. The cake is great warm or at room temperature. Serve with the extra caramel sauce.
Notes
The cake and the caramel sauce can both be left out overnight covered. Or they can be refrigerated for up to 3 days. Bring to room temperature before serving.
Adapted from Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan
Adapted from Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan
foodandfondmemories.com http://www.foodandfondmemories.com/
Disclaimer: I was sent Silk Cashewmilk to use in my recipes and this is a sponsored post. However all of the opinions are 100% my own. 

 

This conversation is sponsored by Silk. The opinions and text are all mine.

Have a delicious day,

Sandy

Sharing Morocco

Sharing Morocco by Ruth Barnes (Photo Credit: Michael Gaskell)

Sharing Morocco by Ruth Barnes
(Photo Credit: Michael Gaskell)

Morocco is one of those far away exotic place that I have always wanted to visit and never have. Until now. The Petite Gourmande Ruth Barnes has transported me there with her new cookbook Sharing Morocco: Exotic Flavors from My Kitchen to Yours. Ruth cleverly weaves stories of life in the Middle East throughout her fabulous book. I was spellbound while reading the book and the recipes and vibrant colorful pictures made my mouth water.

Stuffed Grape Leaves with Lamb and Pinenuts (Photo Credit: John Edwards and Micael Gaskell)

Stuffed Grape Leaves with Lamb and Pinenuts
(Photo Credit: John Edwards and Micael Gaskell)

Sharing Morocco is a reflection of my family heritage – a collection of authentic Moroccan recipes that I grew up eating and still cannot get enough of, such as chocolate baklava, savory tagine and couscous,” Ruth says. “Some are my own and some are family recipes passed down through generations. I can’t wait for you to try them, and my greatest joy would come from home cooks making these recipes a part of their family tradition, too. I hoe you enjoy them.”

Lentil Soup with Lamb (Photo Credit: John Edwards and Micael Gaskell)

Lentil Soup with Lamb
(Photo Credit: John Edwards and Micael Gaskell)

The recipes are well written and easy to follow. There are also a lot of wonderful tips throughout the book. The recipes run the gamut from Salads and Soups, Tanginess, and Main Courses to Street Foods, Sides, Drinks and Desserts. There is even a chapter on where to buy the ingredients listed in the book plus information on the spices of Morocco. With her tantalizing recipes Ruth really brings the rich culinary history of her homeland to life. And what better way to feel like you are in a foreign country than to dine on the delectable food from that far away land. This is a book that anyone who dreams about visiting exotic lands should have on their bookshelf!

Moroccan-Style Stuffed Grape Leaves with Lamb and Pine Nuts "Werq del Imb Ma’amren bil Kebsch"
Serves 4
Also called dolmas or dolmatis throughout the Middle East, these “vine leaves” are stuffed with rice, ground lamb, and pine nuts. The secret to this Moroccan version is baharat, a special blend of several spices including cumin, cinnamon, and allspice, which makes the filling aromatic and layered with flavors. My husband loves to garnish the grape leaves with harissa.
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Ingredients
1 cup uncooked white or brown sticky rice
1 pound ground lamb
½ cup roasted pine nuts
½ bunch cilantro, chopped
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
1 medium onion, chopped
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon baharat (or allspice)
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon pepper
1 large jar grape leaves
1 cup water
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 lemon, cut into wedges
Harissa (Moroccan hot sauce)
Instructions
1. Cook the rice according to the directions on the package.
2. Combine the rice with the lamb, pine nuts, cilantro, paprika, onion, cumin, baharat, salt, and pepper in a mixing bowl.
3. Remove the grape leaves from the jar and wash.
4. Cut the stem from each leaf and lay the leaves on a ἀat surface.
5. Using an ice cream scoop, place one scoop of the meat mixture in the middle of each grape leaf. Fold in the sides and roll to close.
6. Place each leaf in an oiled baking dish, seam side down. Drizzle with olive oil and water, cover the dish, and bake for 40 minutes.
7. Serve with lemon wedges and harissa.
Notes
Sharing Morocco: Exotic Flavors from My Kitchen to Yours
By Ruth Barnes
Greanleaf Book Group Press
October 2014/Hardover
$29.95
foodandfondmemories.com http://www.foodandfondmemories.com/
Lentil Soup with Lamb "Harira"
Serves 6
This traditional soup is served throughout the country and opens the Moroccan dinner feast. Its base of lentils is layered with the flavors of lamb and herbs and is finished with fresh lemon juice.
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Ingredients
3 tablespoons olive oil
1½ pounds boneless leg of lamb or beef chuck steak, cut into 1-inch cubes
1 medium onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, chopped
3 stalks celery, finely chopped
½ bunch cilantro, chopped
½ bunch parsley, chopped
5 fresh tomatoes, peeled and chopped
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon turmeric
1 tablespoon sweet paprika
2 cups lentils, washed and drained
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon pepper
8 cups water
3 tablespoons tomato paste
2 tablespoons flour
1 tablespoon cold water
½ (15-ounce) can of chickpeas, washed and drained
2 lemons, cut into quarters
Instructions
1. In a Dutch oven or cast iron pot, heat the olive oil on medium heat and brown the meat on all sides. Remove with a slotted spoon.
2. Add the onion, garlic, and celery to the pot, stir, and sauté until the vegetables are soft.
3. Return the meat and any juices to the sautéed vegetables and then add the cilantro, parsley, tomatoes, cumin, turmeric, paprika, lentils, salt, and pepper. Mix well and add the water and tomato paste.
4. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer for 1¼ hours.
5. Dissolve the flour in the tablespoon of cold water and stir into the soup. Add the chickpeas and cook for another 15 minutes.
6. To serve, squeeze one lemon quarter onto each bowl of soup.
Notes
Sharing Morocco: Exotic Flavors from My Kitchen to Yours
By Ruth Barnes
Greanleaf Book Group Press
October 2014/Hardover
$29.95
foodandfondmemories.com http://www.foodandfondmemories.com/